Indian Nurses Association of New York organizes Blood Drive in Long Island

Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY), the organization that represents the voice of all Indian origin nurses in New York State is all set to conduct this year’s first blood drive in Long Island, says Annie Sabu, the chairwoman of INANY’s Fundraising and Charity Committee. She said the event will take place on June 1st from 10:45 am to 3:15 pm at Westbury Memorial Library, 445 Jefferson Street, Westbury, NY 11590. Home Health Aide Training Institute and the charity organization Connor’s Closet are also partnering with INANY for

Dr Anna GeorgeThe New York area is currently experiencing a serious blood shortage.  According to the American Red Cross, someone in the United States needs a blood transfusion every two seconds. Studies show that one donation of blood can save at least two lives.  Many reasons such as accidents, operations, cancer treatment and blood diseases increase the importance of blood donation. According to New York Blood Center blood donation has never been so low in the last 20 years. The current shortage of blood is due to an unprecedented level of drop in donations.

Many people have the misconception that donating blood is physically draining and exhausting.  Blood is not drawn from us to the point of exhausting us. A normal healthy body contains nine to twelve pints of blood. A single donation will only give less than a pint of blood. The body, which is constantly making blood cells, can replenish the volume of the lost blood within twenty-four hours and the deficiency of cells within eight weeks.  This writer recently donated double red cell.  It is a special automated process called apheresis to collect two units of just red blood cells during a single donation.  The fluid known as plasma was returned to my body.  A whole blood donation is that we give whole blood with all the components.

Some people are afraid of needles. The only discomfort felt when the needle is inserted into the vein is to draw bloodAnnie Sabu (1) for testing at the doctor’s office, hospital, etc. Some find it difficult to spend time to donate. Yes, it takes about forty-five minutes to an hour for a single donation of blood.   But, when we consider spending an hour spent by us saves two or three lives, or the significant difference and impact our donation makes, it takes us to a different level of invaluable gratification.

Some find it difficult that each donation takes from three quarters to an hour; but when you think that one hour can save two or three lives, the preciousness of blood donation increases. Those who come ready to donate blood will be subjected to donation only after being checked and having a blood test done.

Anyone between the ages of seventeen and seventy-six in normal health can donate blood. Those under the age of sixteen can donate blood with the consent of either of their parents and those above the age of seventy-six with the consent of a doctor. A donor must weigh at least one hundred and ten pounds and have no cold or flue symptoms in the preceding seventy-two hours.  Eligibility of those who are ready to donate blood will be decided only after a health screening.

INANY  is an non-profit organization dedicated to the professional development of Indian nurses and the overall health of the individual, families and communities in the society. The blood drive is just one among INANY’s charity activities. Other initiatives include health fairs, clothing drives, fundraising for charities for local, national and needy in India, direct and indirect relief efforts in disasters, scholarships for nursing students, and tuition discount for higher education.

Dr. Anna George, an associate professor at Molloy University and an NP at Northwell Health who is INANY’s president said that it is hoped that everyone who has a helping mind and general health will cooperate in this life-saving effort. For more information and registration, contact Anne Sabu (516.474.5834), Dr. Anna George (646.732.6143), or Christine Koenig (516.333.3689).

Indian Nurses Association Celebrates 20 Years of Impact and Growth

The Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY), the voice of nurses of Indian origin in New York state, is celebrating its 20th year of foundation and services. The association is planning a meaningful and colorful celebration to mark this significant milestone in its history.

The celebration will take place at Cotillion Caterers in Jericho, Long Island, as the base of the Association is in New York City and its suburbs.  Dr. Anna George, the president of INANY and an Associate Professor at Molloy University, as well as a nurse practitioner at Northwell Health stated that individuals with proven expertise and leadership have been delegated to lead the planning, organization, and celebration of this event.  Annie Sabu, a nurse practitioner at Northwell Health, is the Convenor, and Alphy Sundroop, a nurse educator at Nassau University Medical Center, is the Co-convenor.  INANY will also be releasing a souvenir to commemorate this milestone.  The chair of the souvenir committee is Dr. Shyla Roshin, who is the Chief Nursing Officer at South Beach Psychiatric Center.  Paul D. Panakal, an adjunct professor at Long Island University and a consultant at Northwell Health System, is the co-chair.

INANY was founded in 2004 under the leadership of Dr. Aney Paul, the first Indian nurse ever elected to a legislature in the US.  The association’s goal was to bring together the thousands of Indian nurses practicing in New York state and provide them with a unified voice in the mainstream and professional arenas.  INANY has been collaborating with Grand Canyon University to facilitate tuition discounts for academic advancement.  This has been instrumental in enabling scores of nurses to achieve Master’s and Doctoral degrees, further enhancing their skills and knowledge which in turn paved ladder to elevate their role responsibilities.  Every year, the organization awards scholarships to nursing students in New York and India, supporting the next generation of healthcare professionals.  Through its various initiatives, INANY has been instrumental in establishing the voice of thousands of Indian nurses practicing in New York state.  The association’s efforts have helped to amplify the concerns and needs of this vital healthcare workforce, ensuring that they are recognized and supported in the professional arena.  The association has been offering professional continuing education seminars for nurses.  The continuing education credits are a requirement for nurses to recertify their specialty credentials.  In addition, INANY has sent its teams to provide relief efforts in the Philippines, India, Haiti, and the southern United States after these regions were impacted by natural disasters.  The organization has played a role in supporting recovery efforts in these areas.  Other activities included organizing health fairs in Long Island, Queens and in upstate New York to help the under-insured or uninsured.

After emergence of COVID-19 pandemic, there had been an unprecedented surge in anti-Asian hate incidents across the United States.  INANY was awarded a grant of ten thousand dollars to engage in activities to mitigate the incidents.  Recognizing this surge as a social health issue, INANY developed and conducted an evidence-based intervention training series known as “5D Bystander Intervention” to confidence to and empower possible bystanders to extend helping hands to victims.  This was done in collaboration with the Coalition of Asian Children and Families.

The founding president Dr. Aney Paul and the visionary presidents that followed her – Sosamma Andrews, Usha George, Mary Philip, Tara Shajan, and the current president Dr. Anna George – and their low profiled but sincere and service-oriented leadership teams have been elevating INANY through progressive and transformational ladder.  As an organization embodied by direct-care providing nurses, educators, administrators and executives, scientists, academia, and advanced practice nurses, INANY offers a strong presence in the healthcare of New York state.  As a chapter of the National Association of Indian Nurses in America, INANY is also involved nationally.  Recently NAINA conducted a comprehensive education program to educate nurses to defend against infectious diseases.  This was done as part of a project under American Nurses Association in partnership with Center for Disease Control.

New York state governor Kathy Hochul and New York City mayor Eric Adams were among who appreciated the services of INANY.

Dr. Anna George said that the celebration will be taking place on May 4th together with the Nurses Week celebration.

Paul D. Panakal

Suja Thomas, president of National Association of Indian Nurses in America Appointed to CGFNS Leadership

Suja Thomas, the current president of National Association of Indian Nurses in America (NAINA), has been appointed to Board of Governors of Alliance for Ethical International Recruitment Practices of CGFNS International.  CGFNS International is the world’s largest credentials evaluation organization for nursing and allied health professions.  It evaluates the education, provides license verification, testing and credentials evaluation of nurses graduated in foreign nursing schools for eligibility for licensure and practice.

It is considered as a significant organization in the field of nursing and global healthcare as well as for betterment of global healthcare delivery.  In her role, Suja will be joining a team of twelve highly prominent and scholarly nurses and allied professionals in the United States in adopting responsible and transparent practices of recruitment of foreign-educated health professionals to the US.

NAINA acts as the voice of all Indian nurses in the United States and has chapters in several states in the country.  She works as the Clinical Lead/hospital nursing administrator at the Samuel Stratton VA Medical Center in Albany.  After graduating from Fr. Mullers College of Nursing in Mangalore, Suja took Master of Science in Nursing Education from Russell Sage College in Troy, New York and Post Master’s degree in Adult Gerontology Primary Care Nurse Practitioner program from the same college and is currently pursuing PhD.

As the Adjunct Faculty at Manipal College of Nursing, Maria College in Albany, former teacher at Manipal Academy of Higher Education, primary care nurse and nurse practitioner, educator, nurse executive at Saint Peter’s Health Partners in Albany, and organizational leader, Suja possesses extensive experience and knowledge of the complex healthcare arena and insight into the pursuit of higher standard required in the care delivery.  As the president of NAINA, she spearheaded a national conference of Leadership and Clinical Excellence Conference in Chicago for nurses all across the United States which received appreciation of US Vice President Kamala Harrs and US Surgeon General Vivek Murthy.

In her role as a member of the Board of Governors, Suja will contribute tremendously to create resources on career decisions for nurses who want to come to the United States.  The Advisory Committee will be utilizing research-based knowledge in making changes in the recruitment landscapes.

Indian Nurses Association of New York Holds Health Screening and Education in Long Island

The health screening and education booths of Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY) at the Senior Health Expo in Rockville Center, Long Island was a major attraction for the local
communities in the area. They included blood pressure monitoring, body mass index measurement, blood sugar check, physical and mental health screening, diabetes education, heart- related education and other health maintenance education and guidance. The Senior Health Expo was organized by the first Indian American second term New York State Senator of Long Island
Kevin Thomas. The event was targeted at the seniors in the region to give access to information and resources for maintaining and bettering their health.

INANY, the organization that stands as the voice of Indian nurses living in New York, has been engaged with New York State Senator to extend healthcare services to the underserved communities in his constituency for the last three years. INANY was also a recipient of a $10,000 grant in partnership with Coalition of Asian American Children and Families to address the surge anti-Asian hate incidents after the COVID-19 pandemic began. The nurses conducted an awareness and bystander intervention training program in senior centers, professional forums, social gatherings and as part of a nursing continuing education conference. The training program comprises various strategies that could be used by a witness or bystander of an anti-Asian hate incident to comfortably intervene to help the victim, without compromising safety or fear. Dr.Anna George, the president of INANY pointed out that the strategies are evidence based and have been adopted by various universities and healthcare organizations such as Northwell Health.

INANY also utilized this opportunity to provide innovative and accessible infection control education for frontline healthcare workers to protect their patients. This initiative was part of National Association of Indian Nurses of North America (NAINA) instituting a grant from American Nurses Association.

The nurse-volunteers who attended at the Health Expo comprised of nurses working at bedside, nurse practitioners from cardiac catheter lab, and university professors who shared their expertise to educate on reducing risks of life threatening illnesses and conditions. They also did depression screening and talked about need for seeking help or reaching out to resources when someone from own family or others suffers from mental health conditions or substance abuse. They also counselled about the stigma attached to mental illness.

Taylor Darling, the New York assembly woman from district 18 who observed services of INANY nurses at the Expo said that she was thoroughly impressed and delighted with what INANY did for the health of the community. She talked about the stressors in nursing related to staff shortage, safe staffing issues, faculty shortage and acuity at work and thanked the nurses for their compassion and altruism. Senator Kevin Thomas expressed his gratitude for the services INANY provided to the people of his district and for the dedication of Indian nurses for what they do every day in healthcare facilities.

INANY president Dr. Anna George, Annie Sabu Aleyamma Appukuttan, Grace Alexaner, Nisha Jayan, Grace Geevarghese, Rupinder Kaur, Paul Panakal, Shiney Xavier, Paul Panakal, and Jaya
Vathappally dedicated the day for their voluntary services at the Expo.

Indian Nurses Association of New York Holds Continuing Education Conference

The Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANI) a chapter of National Association of Indian Nurses in America stands as the voice of nurses of Indian origin in New York state. Its priorities are promoting nursing education, improving nursing standard and quality and community support.  INANY conducts continuing nursing education for registered nurses and nurse practitioners to ensure that the stakeholders understand the latest developments in nursing care and treatment so that they could apply evidence-based practice.  \

INANY conducted a free continuing education conference last week with topics from nurses building resilience to confronting violence in the society.  The conference, held at the Kerala Center in Elmont, New York was attended by several RNs and NPs. The Association is also on a grant funded by New York state to mitigate the surge in anti-Asian hate since the onset of COVID-19 pandemic and to train the public to extend helping hand to the victims of anti-Asian hate.

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Dr. Jessy Kurian is a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner with long experience at Northwell Health System, the largest private healthcare system in New York state.  She has been successfully treating thousands of people suffering from mental illness.  Her presentation focused on depression, a mental disorder that affects more than 17 million of American population age 18 and older.  Adults with major depressive disorder have 64 per cent higher risk than the general population for developing coronary artery disease.

They are also at 20 times more likely than the general population thinking about suicide. Many teenagers, college students and young adults who keep depression in themselves tend to self-medicate with substances and become addicts. Women are almost twice likely as men to suffer from depression.  Because of the stigma associated with mental problems, most of the affected individuals and families do not seek the treatment, though this common mental disorder can be treated.  Dr. Kurian called upon the healthcare professionals to be advocates of those suffering to seek treatment and to help them lead a normal life.   Dr. Kurian talked about the symptoms of mood disorder, how to identify the different types of mood disorder, causes of mood disorder, and the various treatment modalities.

Dr. Myrtha Rabinowich, a nurse scientist and a leader of evidence-based practice initiatives in the twenty-three hospitals in Northwell Health System presented on the need for restoring balance and energy through self-care, mindfulness and meditation. Effective practice of mindfulness is an excellent resource to recover from stressful challenges and restoring resiliency.  Dr. Rabinowich taught simple and practical ways to minimize stress of life affecting physical and mental health and to how to grow inner strengths to balance the unpredictable daily life.

Dr. Ani Jacob, a Nurse Scientist at Northwell Health and Clinical Associate Professor at Adelphi University moderated the panel discussion about the need for bystander intervention to address the anti-Asian hate related incidents across the United States which saw drastic surge since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic.  New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s Dr. Solimole Kuruvilla, Molloy College Associate Professor and INANI president Dr. Anna George, and Adelphi University Assistant Professor Dr. Mercy Joseph were the panel members.  The panel also gave a training on the evidence-based strategies to extend helping hand to address anti-Asian hate related incident without compromising self-safety.

Nurses and nurse practitioners who attended the conference received free continuing education hours required for their license.   credits required for the professional practice of nurses and nurse practitioners are available free of charge to conference attendees.

INANI President Dr. Anna George gave the welcome speech. The moderator of the program, vice president of INANI, Dr. Shyla Roshin introduced Dr. Jessy Kurian, Dr. Myrta Rabinowitch, Dr. Ani Jacob, Dr. Solimol Kuruvilla, and Dr. Mercy Joseph.  Anto Paul, the chair of the professional development committee gave vote of thanks.

INANY and Adelphi University Highlight Anti-Asian Incidents

Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY) partnered with Adelphi University in New York to hold a panel discussion on the surge in anti-Asian hate incidents in the United States.  The program was initiated and planned by the university’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusivity Council. For almost a year INANY has been collaborating with the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families with a special grant from New York State to fight the rapid increase in the anti-Asian incidents in the United States.

Though the history of anti-Asian hate related racism, discrimination and crime is as old as the Asian immigration to the United States, there has been an unprecedented sharp rise of incidents against them since the onset of COVID pandemic.

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Dr. Ani Jacob, a clinical associate professor at Adelphi University, a nurse scientist at Northwell Health System and chair of INANY’s Research and Grants Committee was the moderator of discussion which was attended by students and faculty as well as virtually attended by students, other faculty and Asian American Pacific Islander organizations.  Dr. Anna George, the president of INANY, a nurse practitioner at Northwell and associate professor at Molloy University, Paul D Panakal, an adjunct faculty at Long Island University and a consultant at Northwell Health, and Dr. Mercy Joseph, an Assistant Professor at Adelphi University were on the panel.

Hate-related incidents against Asians in the United States date back to the beginning immigration of the community in the 19th century itself. The discrimination was validated and justified by legislation and court rulings.  There was even a court ruling denying a right for Asians and others to testify against whites.  The rules and laws were changed, Asian and Pacific Islander communities have started enjoying the opportunities for the American dream. Still, the nation witnessed an exponential rise in the incidents of hate and discrimination.  Asian Americans experienced bias, avoidance, bullying, exclusion, spitting and coughing on the face, direct and indirect verbal harassment, demeaning and physical assault.  The hate related mass shootings at a spa where six of the eight people killed were Asians and six of the nine killed at the Indianapolis FedEx facility were belonging to Sikh community.  The Stop AAPI Hate movement which collects data on incidents of racism, discrimination and crime against Asian Americans reported more than 11,400 incidents from March 2020 to March 2022.  These are self-reported incidents do not reflect the unreported cases.  Another survey conducted by the movement found that at least one in eight Asians had experienced discrimination.

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Based on the 2020 census the Asian American Pacific Islander community constitutes 6.2 per cent of the US population and is considered as the fastest growing social group in the country.  Chinese (4.15 million), Indians (4.14 million), Filipinos (2.88 million), and Vietnamese (1.85 million) are the largest groups.  The hostility and suspicion that Asians were responsible for COVID and that they are carriers of coronavirus did have a negative affect among the communities.  The victims, their families and other loved ones found themselves living in fear and isolation, feeling unwanted in the society.

There are several organizations formed to stand against and to improve the social understanding of the communities.  Asian Americans advancing Justice that is active to protect the civil rights and to advocate for justice, the National Asia Pacific American Women’s Forum which provides umbrella for Asian women, Asian American Advocacy Fund, Coalition for Asian American Children and Families are some organizations in the forefront.  Indian Nurses Association of New York is collaborating the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families in raising awareness of the anti-Asian hate related incidents and to engage communities in mitigating the problem.

The panel discussion was titled Safety, Equity and Harmony for AAPI and was held at the Thomas Dixon Lovely Ballroom at Adelphi University campus.  Dr. Kattiria Gonzalez, assistant professor at Adelphi introduced the panelists and welcomed the attendees.  The panelists presented official reports, statistics and other facts with some video clips of certain incidents to describe the distressing social situation among the 23 million Asian American Pacific Islander community.  The panelists also proposed an evidence based strategy to mitigate if someone witness a hate related bias or criminal incident.  The strategy called Bystander Intervention provides guidelines for safely intervene a hate-related situation.  They also called upon initiating a conversation among the students and others to raise awareness and improve education on the history of hate and violence.  Adelphi University associate professor Dr. Janet Raman, Clinical Assistant Professor Dr. Charles Cal shared their own experiences and views and thanked INANY for their efforts.

Dr. Ani Jacob acknowledged and thanked Caitlin McElroy, the director of strategic initiatives at the University for working hard to successfully organizing and conducting the program.  She appreciated and thanked Dr. Anna George, Paul D Panakal and Mercy Joseph for conducting an in depth and informative discussion.

Indian Nurses Association Of New York Installs Its New Leadership

Tyson Center in Floral Park, New York witnessed the colorful installation of the incoming governing board of Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY) for the term 2023-24 in the presence of members of INANY, their families, community leaders and elected Indian American officials.

The executive board and the advisory board lighted the lamp and received Proclamation from Senator Keven Thomas, the only Indian American Senator in New York State senate.

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Dr. Anna George (president), Dr. Shyla Roshin (vice president), Alphi Sundroop (secretary), Dr. Jessy Kurian (joint secretary), Jaya Thomas (treasurer), and Aleyamma Appukuttan (joint secretary) constitute the executive board.  Tara Shajan (chair), Mary Philip, Usha George, Sosamma Andrews, and Honorable Dr. Aney Paul will continue as the advisory board.  The chairs of various committees are Dr. Solymole Kuruvilla (bylaws), Salil Panakal (Awards and Scholarships), Anto Paul (education and professional development), Mary Philip (election), Sini Varghese (advanced practice nurse forum), Paul Panakal (communications), Jessy James (cultural and social programs), Shabnampreet Kaur (membership), Annie Sabu (fundraising and charity), Dr. Ani Jacob (research and grants).  Esthor Devadoss, Grace Alexander, Lyssy Alex and Aleyamma Mathew will be area coordinators.  Mary Philip and Paul Panakal organized and smoothened the ceremonial process followed by Mary Philip’s administration of the oath.

The only Asian elected to New York State senate from district 6 in Long Island was eloquent of his own familiarity with the activities that INANY serves.  He expressed his gratitude of what INANY did for outreach to the underserved individuals and families in his constituency by organizing and conducting health fair and blood drive for the community.  He promised that he would continue to advocate for the nurses who he said, are the people working very hard in hospitals and nursing homes. Tara Shajan, the chair of the advisory board introduced and welcomes the senator.

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The reelected president Dr. Anna George was introduced and welcomes by her student Shabnampreet Kaur.  Dr. George showcased the contributions of INANY to the educational and professional development of nurses, for the mental health of nursing after the pandemic, involvement of the Association in the health of communities in need and the efforts to mitigate the surge of anti-Asian hate incidents since the beginning of COVID-19.

Suja Thomas, the incoming president of National Association of Indian Nurses of America was a keynote speaker.  She was introduced by Anto Paul.  Suja expressed her gratitude for INANY’s professional and social initiatives for health and healthcare both within and outside of the communities.  She, as the leader of the national association, offered and requested support.

Honorable Dr. Aney Paul who took the lead in forming INANY and was the founding president, continues to serve in its advisory board.  As the first Indian nurse ever elected in the United States as a legislator, she always stood for the welfare of nurses and also initiated health related legislations in her county of Rockland.  She currently serves as the vice chair of Rockland County legislature.  She talked about how gratified and happy she was being part of INANY and being experiencing the good things INANY does for both nurses and the society at large.

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Honorable Ragini Srivastava, the recently elected Town Clerk of North Hempstead was introduced by INANY’s outgoing vice president Dr. Solymole Kuruvilla.  Ms. Srivastava who immigrated to the US from India became a successful business woman and rose to become the first Indian American Town Clerk in Long Island.  Ms. Srivastava spoke highly of INANY and the leadership’s concern for the poor and the underserved community.  She praised and thanked the constantly compassionate and empathetic care the Indian nurses in the area provide thousands and thousands of persons and their resiliency they evidenced especially during the pandemic.

The event started with self introduction of the emcees Lyssy Alex and Dr. Solymole Kuruvilla.  Reena Sabu sang a prayer song followed by American national anthem by Ashley Anthony and Indian national anthem by Reena Sabu and Rosy Mathew.  The people were entertained with action song by George, Theresa, Catherine, Jacob, Hanna, Krystal, Santana and Aarin.  Sherly Sebastian and Bency Jamie sang solo songs.  Group dances were performed by Ashley Pulinthanathu, Ashlin Benny, Tessa Lalson, Isabel Jacob, Nicole Manalil, Veena, Ashley and Tina.  Ashwin Antony performed an instrumental music.  Lyssy Alex and Dr. Solymole Kuruvilla, the emcees, moderated the programs smoothly and efficiently.  People used the lunchtime for extended networking.

Indian Nurses Association Of New York (INANY) Prepares To Install Its New Leadership

Since its inception in 2004, the Indian Nurses Association of New York, as the representative voice of all Indian nurses who came to America, has been opening up unique and innovative socio-professional paths.  In the early years, the goals were to attract more people to the nursing field through scholarships and tuition waivers, while widening the pathways to higher education and continuing education credits required for certification for those already practicing nurses.

The preceding years were aiming at health workshops, seminars and health fares to improving the health and well-being of the community and the society at large. Health fair was instrumental in providing essential services from vital signs to blood tests to mammograms to individuals and families living in areas where public welfare schemes do not reach them.

Rockland Legislative County Vice Chairwoman Dr. Aney Paul was the founding president. The successive presidents could use the strong foundation and organizational structure for vibrant expansion and advancement for INANY. Sosamma Andrews, Usha George, prominent social activist Mary Philip, Tara Shajan, and Dr. Anna George were leading INANY to new heights as a professional nursing association.

INANY has received praise and recognition from New York State Senators to New York City Mayor and Governor Cathy Hochul. In the face of increasing anti-Asian hate related incidents, INANY has partnered with Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) to raise awareness of the concerning social in the community and to help them address in safe and evidence-based manner.

INANY is preparing to install its new leadership team for the 2023 – 2024 operating year, promising more extensive professional services to multiple stakeholders. In the election held in October, the current president Dr. Anna George was re-elected as the president unopposed. Vice President Dr. Shyla Roshin, Secretary Alphy Sundroop, Joint Secretary Dr. Jessy Kurian, Treasurer Jaya Thomas and Joint Treasurer Aleyamma Appukuttan are the other executive board members.

President Anna George, PhD, APRN, RN, FNP-C, is an associate professor at Molloy University and a nurse practitioner at Northwell Health, the largest private healthcare network and employer in New York state. As the president she has shown all-round transformational leadership force throughout the last two years in driving INANY in the last two years. Dr. George exemplified how a nurse, aside from its role at work, could bring good things to the health and wellbeing of others and the society.

The presentations she gave at her colleges in New Delhi and Kerala highlighted the contributions nursing and advanced practice nursing contribute to healthcare and showcased the recognition and respect that Nursing as a profession receives in the United States.  She was also the coordinator of religious education at the Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Catholic parish in Long Island and is teaching the tenth-grade religious classes.

Dr. Shyla Roshin DNP, RN, the incoming vice president is a director of nursing at a New York City Health and Hospital Corporation. She was serving as the chair of the Education Committee in the current term.  To answer the call of the time, she planned and virtually presented multiple mental health programs to the public designed to counter the consequences of the COVID pandemic on the community and healthcare workers.  She also led organization’s continuing education programs for professional nurses.

Secretary-elect Alphy Sundroop MSN, RN is a critical care educator at Nassau University Medical Center. Alphy who serves as the secretary of the Marian Mothers of Long Island’s Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Catholic parish, has facilitated an easy and smooth election process for INANY during her tenure as the chair of the election committee.

New Joint Secretary Dr. Jessy Kurian DNP, PMHNP-BC, RN, who works as a psychiatric nurse practitioner at Northwell Health, is a comfort to thousands of individuals and families struggling with mental illness.  Dr. Jessy Kurian has made her mark in the treatment of mental illness by providing the most comprehensive treatment regimens available in the medical field with the compassion of a nurse. She has earned the appreciation of doctors, administration and the nursing community at her workplace.  Dr. Kurian who is taking the title as the joint secretary, has led the INANY’s Byelaws and APRN committees in the past.

New Treasurer Jaya Thomas, PMHNP-BC, FNP, APRN, RN, MSc, who serves as the Assistant Director of Nursing at New York State-owned Creed Moore Psychiatric Center, has been serving as a member of INANY’s Education Committee and Rockland County Coordinator.  She was one of the panelists in a mental health education seminar held for healthcare workers.  She was also the winner of INANY’s annual essay contest in 2022.  She is a ward secretary of Saint Alphonsa Ward of the Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Catholic parish in Long Island.

The new Joint Treasurer Aleyamma Appukuttan is an active member worker of the organization for a long time.  She has been engaged in various philanthropic and life-saving activities for many years and has invested selfless service for the needy. A nurse of fifty years in Indian military and in the United States, she dedicated a good part of her life to the good of others with extraordinary modesty by organizing soup kitchens, collecting clothes, personal donations to low profile poor and needy and raising funds for projects. In recognition of her all-round humanitarian services, she was awarded the prestigious ‘Global Woman of Excellence’ award in May 2022.  She received the award at a special gala event in the Conference Room of speaker Nancy Pelosi at Capitol Hill in Washington DC.

The term of the governing board is two years.  The formal inauguration of the new committee will take place on January 7th starting at 10 am at a special ceremony at the Tyson Center in Nassau County, Long Island. Elected officials in the area like New York State senator Kevin Thomas, INANY’s founding president and Rockland County Legislative Vice Chair Dr. Aney Paul, North Hempstead Town Clerk Ragini Srivastava, and a prominent nephrologist and Chancellor Xavier University School of Medicine in Aruba, Dr. Ganesh Bhatt will be among the guests.  Suja Thomas, the new president of National Association of Indian Nurses of America will be a keynote speaker. Dr. Anna George noted that the event is open and welcome for all nurses, regardless of their membership status, their families and other well-wishers.

INANY Partners With Coalition For Asian American Children And Families To Address Anti-Asian Hate

A family was shopping at Sam’s Club.  Father and mother and their two children of six and two years.   A man who never saw this family followed them.  He assumed that they came from China.  He found a steak knife somewhere in the store.  He approached the father and made a cut on the father’s face before disappearing from the store.  A little while later, he returned to Sam’s Club with another sharp knife from outside.  He then located the young family and then started attacking the two children who were sitting the basket at the front of the shopping cart.  The six-year-old child was cut on the face. Before he could do anything further, the people around blocked him and handed him to the police.  He confessed to the police that the family came from China and that they were careers of COVID virus.  He also confessed that his intention was to kill the six-year-old child. The incident took place on March 14, 2020.

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On October 3rd, the police arrested a thirty-seven-year-old man for assaulting and robbing fourteen women between the ages of fifty and seventy-two.  The incidents occurred within two months.  All the victims were wearing saris or other Indian clothes.  In one incident, a husband and wife who were walking along the road were approached by the man and asked for directions. He then walked behind the couple and pushed the woman to the ground.  He then turned to the husband and punched his face.  Before running away, he snatched the woman’s necklace.  The woman suffered a broken wrist and husband a fractured nose.  Police say the attacks were motivated by communal hatred.

This past April, the New York Times reported that Sikhs were physically assaulted three times on the same block in a quiet part of Queens, New York.

Thousands of incidents of discrimination on the basis of color, class, race and heritage have been reported.  From March 2020 to March 2022, more than 11400 anti-Asian hate related incidents have been tracked by Coalition for Asian American Pacific Islanders.  There is no statistics of the unreported actual incidents.  These incidents not only destroy the lives of the victims but also traumatize and disrupt their families and relatives. They are creating fear, suspicion and conflict in the community they belong to. It makes you feel out of place in society. Many feel marginalized.  The right of the victimized individuals, of their loved ones and of the people in the community they belong to boldly, freely and safely go out is eroding.

Since the beginning of immigration, Asian Americans have been subject to struggles for equality, social inclusion, and recognition.  Suspicion, fear and loathing of strangers, which Asians have been experiencing from time to time, have reached a peak in recent years, especially with the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic.  Discrimination through words, behavior, and pretending to be invisible is common, as is physical and psychological abuse. Hate killing is on the rise in our society.

Picture : TheUNN

Such incidents of xenophobia and intolerance, which are so frequent as to damage the values and integrity of the community itself, should be seen as a call for concerted and strong efforts by the affected Asian American communities.  Many of those who witness heinous violence and discrimination want to help or stop the victims, but are rendered helpless by their own insecurities.  Hate violence doesn’t happen at a specific place or time. The trend suggests that we are all increasingly vulnerable to discrimination and hatred. As with the possibility of witnessing events.

US Census Bureau and US Department of Labor group Chinese, Indians, Filipinos, Pakistan and people from other South and South East Asian countries, and people from the Pacific Islands are counted as a single racial group.  This demographic group, known as Asian American Pacific Islanders, is led by Chinese (5.1 million), Indians (4.5 million) and Filipinos (4.1), according to the last count. In New York state, the Asian Pacific Islander community of 2.5 million is considered the fastest growing community in the state.

Asians are seen as a model minority because of the community’s perceived higher degree of socioeconomic success than the other communities.  The ironic truth is that this cosmetic stereotype blankets the underserved struggling individuals and families in the community.

Coalition of Asian American Children and Families is a collaborative organization that advocates for social equity and justice and equal rights for educational opportunities for families and children. The Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANI), the voice of Indian nurses in New York state, is partnering with this organization to address anti-Asian hate.  It is currently engaged, among other goals, in raising awareness in the community and equip individuals with skills to prevent violence without compromising their own safety.

The strategy, known as Bystander intervention uses 5D methods to develop the awareness, skills and courage needed to intervene in a situation when another individual is in need of help.  INANY intends to use community forums and small groups as appropriate platforms and fulfills its mission through them.   Dr. Anna George, an associate professor at Molloy University and president of INANY noted that ECHO for Help, a prominent volunteer and charity organization based in Long Island offered the first forum for INANY to provide the training.   Dr. Anna George and Dr. Ani Jacob, a Nurse Scientist at Northwell Health System presented for the first time at the ECHO for Help.

Dr. George expressed her gratitude Sabu Lukos and Raju Abraham of ECHO for their unconditional welcome and support for making unity and acceptance a path to compassion.  The next presentation against anti-Asian hatred will be at INANY’s general body meeting on November 19 at Dilbar Restaurant in Floral Park in Queens, Dr. George indicated.  America’s first Indian Acute Care Nurse Practitioner and Director of New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation Dr. Solymol Kuruvila and Paul D Panakal will be speaking on the 19th of November.

Indian Nurses Association Of New York Receives Grant To Fight Anti Asian Hate

The Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANI), the voice and representative organization of Indian professional nurses in New York State, has received a grant from New York State for its work against discrimination and hatred against Asian Americans.  The grant amount is ten thousand dollars. The INANY leadership is proud stand behind this grant as a recognition and acknowledgment of the services this professional organization of nurses has rendered over the years and its ability to effectively influence the communities it represent.

Asians in America have been subjected to a great deal of discrimination and hate violence since the start of the Covid pandemic.  Similarly, the University of Southern California’s Center for Economic and Social Research’s Understanding Coronavirus in America survey reports that Asians experience mental illness at a higher level than other social groups consequent to the beginning of the pandemic.

A recent survey by Pew Research Center finds that 63 per cent of Asian Americans say that violence against Asian Americans in the US is increasing.  Dr. Anna George, the Association’s current president said “At a time when there is a need to take evidence-based measures to alleviate this problem or address the hate, violence, and discrimination experienced by Asian Americans and Asian immigrants, INANY is ready to step forward in partnership with other community service organizations of interest”.

About 2.1 million, about 11 per cent of New York State’s population are Asian Americans.   It is nicknamed the ‘model minority’ because it generally stands ahead of all other social groups due to educational attainment, socioeconomic success, representation in managerial and professional occupations and household income.

The stereotype has also created consequences.  The poor and helpless are often ignored, misunderstood or left unaccounted for.   The reality is that those who suffer from poverty, linguistic isolation and overcrowded housing are invisible behind the big headline of ‘model minority’.   The Asian American Pacific Islander Community Fund is included in the New York State budget to address this plight.

Dr. George explained that the project of INANY Grant will be implemented in collaboration with the Coalition for Asian American Children and Families.   A committee of professional nursing leaders including Dr. Soleymole Kuruvilla, Dr. Shyla Roshin, Paul D Panakal, Dr. Ani Jacob, Grace Alexander, Aleyamma Appukkuttan, Jessy James,  Jincy Chacko and Dr. George who have rendered selfless services in the society has been formed for the project.  She emphasized that the project will have completed its implementation in March 2023.

Indian Nurses Association Of New York (INANY) Partners In Blood Drive In Long Island

In partnership with the Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY), Senator Kevin Thomas, ECHO – a New York charity organization, Long Island Volunteer Center, Seventh Battalion Chief Council and New York Blood Center, a blood drive will be conducted in Uniondale in an effort to alleviate the worsening blood shortage.  The event is being held at the Uniondale Fire Department (154 Uniondale Avenue) in Uniondale on Tuesday, August 23rd from 2pm to 8pm.

The recent heat wave the New York area has experienced, summer travel, and the increasing number of Covid cases caused significant decrease in blood donations.  The New York Blood Center has declared a blood emergency because of the acute shortage of life-saving blood for patients with cancer or other diseases and conditions, those undergoing surgery, and those who need blood when injured in accidents.  According to New York Blood Center a pint of blood can save three lives.  It is safe for healthy adults to donate blood and there is no risk of infection as a new needle set is used for each stick.  The body will replace the donated volume within forty-eight hours.  The whole lost blood cells will be replaced within four to eight weeks.  An average healthy adult has between eight to twelve pints of blood in the body. Usually an adult can donate blood again eight weeks after a donation.

The organizers said that walk-ins are welcome, but appointments make it more convenient.  Those who volunteer to donate could The organizers request to those who want to help lives by donating blood to call 1-800-933-BLOOD or use the link https://donate.nybc.org/donor/schedules/drive_schedule/307166 to make appointment or walk in to 154 Uniondale Avenue, Uniondale, NY 11553 between 2 pm and 8 pm on August 23rd.

Indian Christian Day: A Day Of Unity And Spirit To Celebrate Indian Christian Heritage

The Indian Christian Day (Jesus Bhakti Divas) organized to celebrate the Indian heritage and Christian spirit to show solidarity with persecuted Christians in India, made history as Christians of Indian origin  gathered, read the Bible in their own languages and sang prayer songs, showcasing “a bright union of fervent faith” as they came from the states of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania in Elmont, NY on Sunday, July 3rd, 2022.

The event was organized by the Federation of Indian American Christian Organizations of North America (FIACONA), a forum of Christian organizations in response to the insidious attempts to alienate and attach the Christians through the propaganda that the Christian faith was left behind by British colonialism in India, despite its two thousand years of tradition.

The event also coincided with the 1950th anniversary of the martyrdom of Saint Thomas.  Historically, July 3rd is celebrated as St. Thomas day by Christians across India. However, starting from 2021, the day is being celebrated as Indian Christian Day in India and among the global Diaspora of Christians. In the United States, it is estimated that Christians from India constitute about 20% of the Diaspora, which amounts to close to a million non-resident Indians and people of Indian origin.

The gathering, which was blessed with the presence of bishops and priests from various churches, began with a chendamela and a procession. St. Vincent de Paul Malankara Catholic Church in Elmont became a platform for Christian unity. The conference started with the bishops lighting the lamp as a symbol of Indian heritage and patriotism.

Fiacona President Koshy George pointed out  in his welcome speech that our established belief is that Saint Thomas has brought the gospel to India and was martyred in AD 72.  To mark its 1900 years, the government of India issued a postage stamp in 1972. So this year marks the 1950th anniversary of the martyrdom of Saint Thomas. Mr. Koshy also expressed his deep concern on the growing persecution of Christians in India as the fundamental religious freedom guaranteed under India’s constitution is no longer guaranteed under the BJP rule under the Indian Courts’ eyes.   Last year alone 761 cases of persecution have been identified which have been published in a book form by FIACONA.  He said that the purpose of the meeting is to express our pain against such atrocities.

Rt. Rev. Dr. Dharmaraj Rasalam, the Moderator of the Church of South India, spoke about how the arrival of St. Thomas not only impacted the lives of Christians and paid tribute to the sacrifices of the Christian community to the nation in uplifting the poor and oppressed. Rev. Dr. Ruben Mark, the Deputy moderator Bishop spoke about the love Indian Christians in the Diaspora have for India and encouraged them to continue with the unity they have exhibited at the gathering. He described how the arrival and activities of St. Thomas influenced India. The works of St. Thomas is crucial in the Christian faith. He also extolled the diaspora’s love for India.  He said that we are proud to be Indian Christians.  He said the willingness to sacrifice for the faith was part of the Christian faith.  Despite being a persecuted community, Christians are not united.  But today, all the sects of Christians are happy to attend this event.

Bishop Johncy Itty, Bishop of the Episcopal Church in Long Island, New York, said that India, along with the rest of the world, is going through a serious crisis today.  However, our faith should sustain us in such a time as this.  He pointed out that India and the world are in various conflicts. There is no time in life without conflict. But now it is too much. But God leads us by the hand. We may not be able to change the times, but we can make changes.

Rev. Dr. Itty Abraham of the Indian Pentecostal Church, in his speech, encouraged Christians to be steadfast and said, “It is Christ that built the Church, and no forces would be able to undo it. The propaganda to paint Christianity in India as part of the colonial legacy is ill-conceived and will not gain footing.”

The persecution against Christians is increasing Rev. Dr. Itti Abraham pointed out. But it won’t break us. Christ builds the church. No evil shall prevail against it. Jesus himself said that there will be such persecutions. In such situations, we need to move forward with unity. He said that it is wrong to think that the Indian Christianity is a faith arisen from British colonialism.

CSI Church General Secretary Adv. Fernandez Rathinaraja pointed to Saint Thomas as a social reformer.  It was work against human sacrifice and caste system that led to his martyrdom.  Secularism is enshrined In the preamble of the Indian Constitution. There have been concerted efforts to undermine it. Religion should not be a part of political life. The state should be neutral in religious matters. Protests against these are taking place in the states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra and Kerala. He pointed out that the administration is able to suppress the voice of protest in other states.

Father John Thomas representing Orthodox Church, urged his fellow Christians to follow the path of St. Thomas in taking the message of Christ across the people.  Christ had many followers. But in the end only a few remained. Faithful men like St. Thomas did not hesitate to sacrifice themselves. The situation can be dire. But trust in God. Let the cross of Jesus guide us, he said.

Bishop Mar Joy Alappatt who has just been elevated to the head of Syro Malabar Eparchy of Saint Thomas the Apostle of Chicago expressed his thrill to participate in the program which he though he had participated in ecumenical functions in New York and Chicago, this was the first time he was participating in one of this kind.   “This gathering on St. Thomas Day is significant. We become Christian people through the mission work of Thomas. The contribution of Christians to the development of India is inestimable.   We are saddened that Christians are being persecuted not only in India but all over the world. Prayer is our weapon against it. Christian faith strengthens us for martyrdom. Jesus himself has said that there will be such persecutions. But He has also assured that He will always be with us. So don’t be afraid. We do not hesitate to suffer. But persecution caused by injustice is unacceptable. We must question it. Through his own life and death, Thomas has shown us the way.  So we must strengthen our faith,” he said.

Saint Thomas is one of the strongest characters in the Bible. Especially in the Gospel of John. St. Thomas is mentioned there three times. In Chapter 11, Thomas arrives to comfort Martha and Mary’s family.   They are mourning the death of their brother Lazarus. Thomas forces Jesus to visit Bethany. Thomas also witnessed a miracle when Jesus came.  We see the bravery of St. Thomas in the Bible. But today’s Christians have lost that courage. We dare not bear witness to Christ. Likewise, we must strive for our unity should be willing to testify to Christ with prayer – he said.

The General Secretary of Church South India, in Chennai, Adv. Fernandas Rathaniraja, in his speech, warned the audience about the concerted efforts vested interests are making to remove the word secularism from the constitution and transform India into a Hindu Rashtra and urged vigilance.

George Abraham, one of the leading organizers of the program began his vote of thanks by repeating from Bible “how good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in the unity”.  He said that we have witnessed an extraordinary manifestation of unity, unit of Christians from india, across regions and languages despite the denominational differences.

The program was enriched with Bible readings in Malayalam, Telugu, English, Tamil, Punjabi, Kannada, Hindi, and Gujarati and prayer songs by choirs from Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Catholic Church, St. Paul’s International Lutheran Church, CSI Jubilee Memorial Church, Immanuel Lutheran Church, and Bethlehem Punjabi Church. A group of nurses from Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Church entertained with a Marggam Kali, a traditional Christian dance from Kerala.  The program was moderated by Shre John and Leno Thomas.

Indian Christian Day: A Day Of Unity And Spirit To Celebrate Indian Christian Heritage

The Indian Christian Day (Jesus Bhakti Divas) organized to celebrate the Indian heritage and Christian spirit to show solidarity with persecuted Christians in India, made history as Christians of Indian origin  gathered, read the Bible in their own languages and sang prayer songs, showcasing “a bright union of fervent faith” as they came from the states of New York, New Jersey, Connecticut and Pennsylvania in Elmont, NY on Sunday, July 3rd, 2022.

The event was organized by the Federation of Indian American Christian Organizations of North America (FIACONA), a forum of Christian organizations in response to the insidious attempts to alienate and attach the Christians through the propaganda that the Christian faith was left behind by British colonialism in India, despite its two thousand years of tradition.

The event also coincided with the 1950th anniversary of the martyrdom of Saint Thomas.  Historically, July 3rd is celebrated as St. Thomas day by Christians across India. However, starting from 2021, the day is being celebrated as Indian Christian Day in India and among the global Diaspora of Christians. In the United States, it is estimated that Christians from India constitute about 20% of the Diaspora, which amounts to close to a million non-resident Indians and people of Indian origin.

The gathering, which was blessed with the presence of bishops and priests from various churches, began with a chendamela and a procession. St. Vincent de Paul Malankara Catholic Church in Elmont became a platform for Christian unity. The conference started with the bishops lighting the lamp as a symbol of Indian heritage and patriotism.

Fiacona President Koshy George pointed out  in his welcome speech that our established belief is that Saint Thomas has brought the gospel to India and was martyred in AD 72.  To mark its 1900 years, the government of India issued a postage stamp in 1972. So this year marks the 1950th anniversary of the martyrdom of Saint Thomas. Mr. Koshy also expressed his deep concern on the growing persecution of Christians in India as the fundamental religious freedom guaranteed under India’s constitution is no longer guaranteed under the BJP rule under the Indian Courts’ eyes.   Last year alone 761 cases of persecution have been identified which have been published in a book form by FIACONA.  He said that the purpose of the meeting is to express our pain against such atrocities.

Rt. Rev. Dr. Dharmaraj Rasalam, the Moderator of the Church of South India, spoke about how the arrival of St. Thomas not only impacted the lives of Christians and paid tribute to the sacrifices of the Christian community to the nation in uplifting the poor and oppressed. Rev. Dr. Ruben Mark, the Deputy moderator Bishop spoke about the love Indian Christians in the Diaspora have for India and encouraged them to continue with the unity they have exhibited at the gathering. He described how the arrival and activities of St. Thomas influenced India. The works of St. Thomas is crucial in the Christian faith. He also extolled the diaspora’s love for India.  He said that we are proud to be Indian Christians.  He said the willingness to sacrifice for the faith was part of the Christian faith.  Despite being a persecuted community, Christians are not united.  But today, all the sects of Christians are happy to attend this event.

Bishop Johncy Itty, Bishop of the Episcopal Church in Long Island, New York, said that India, along with the rest of the world, is going through a serious crisis today.  However, our faith should sustain us in such a time as this.  He pointed out that India and the world are in various conflicts. There is no time in life without conflict. But now it is too much. But God leads us by the hand. We may not be able to change the times, but we can make changes.

Rev. Dr. Itty Abraham of the Indian Pentecostal Church, in his speech, encouraged Christians to be steadfast and said, “It is Christ that built the Church, and no forces would be able to undo it. The propaganda to paint Christianity in India as part of the colonial legacy is ill-conceived and will not gain footing.”

The persecution against Christians is increasing Rev. Dr. Itti Abraham pointed out. But it won’t break us. Christ builds the church. No evil shall prevail against it. Jesus himself said that there will be such persecutions. In such situations, we need to move forward with unity. He said that it is wrong to think that the Indian Christianity is a faith arisen from British colonialism.

CSI Church General Secretary Adv. Fernandez Rathinaraja pointed to Saint Thomas as a social reformer.  It was work against human sacrifice and caste system that led to his martyrdom.  Secularism is enshrined In the preamble of the Indian Constitution. There have been concerted efforts to undermine it. Religion should not be a part of political life. The state should be neutral in religious matters. Protests against these are taking place in the states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra and Kerala. He pointed out that the administration is able to suppress the voice of protest in other states.

Father John Thomas representing Orthodox Church, urged his fellow Christians to follow the path of St. Thomas in taking the message of Christ across the people.  Christ had many followers. But in the end only a few remained. Faithful men like St. Thomas did not hesitate to sacrifice themselves. The situation can be dire. But trust in God. Let the cross of Jesus guide us, he said.

Bishop Mar Joy Alappatt who has just been elevated to the head of Syro Malabar Eparchy of Saint Thomas the Apostle of Chicago expressed his thrill to participate in the program which he though he had participated in ecumenical functions in New York and Chicago, this was the first time he was participating in one of this kind.   “This gathering on St. Thomas Day is significant. We become Christian people through the mission work of Thomas. The contribution of Christians to the development of India is inestimable.   We are saddened that Christians are being persecuted not only in India but all over the world. Prayer is our weapon against it. Christian faith strengthens us for martyrdom. Jesus himself has said that there will be such persecutions. But He has also assured that He will always be with us. So don’t be afraid. We do not hesitate to suffer. But persecution caused by injustice is unacceptable. We must question it. Through his own life and death, Thomas has shown us the way.  So we must strengthen our faith,” he said.

Saint Thomas is one of the strongest characters in the Bible. Especially in the Gospel of John. St. Thomas is mentioned there three times. In Chapter 11, Thomas arrives to comfort Martha and Mary’s family.   They are mourning the death of their brother Lazarus. Thomas forces Jesus to visit Bethany. Thomas also witnessed a miracle when Jesus came.  We see the bravery of St. Thomas in the Bible. But today’s Christians have lost that courage. We dare not bear witness to Christ. Likewise, we must strive for our unity should be willing to testify to Christ with prayer – he said.

The General Secretary of Church South India, in Chennai, Adv. Fernandas Rathaniraja, in his speech, warned the audience about the concerted efforts vested interests are making to remove the word secularism from the constitution and transform India into a Hindu Rashtra and urged vigilance.

George Abraham, one of the leading organizers of the program began his vote of thanks by repeating from Bible “how good and pleasant it is when God’s people live together in the unity”.  He said that we have witnessed an extraordinary manifestation of unity, unit of Christians from india, across regions and languages despite the denominational differences.

The program was enriched with Bible readings in Malayalam, Telugu, English, Tamil, Punjabi, Kannada, Hindi, and Gujarati and prayer songs by choirs from Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Catholic Church, St. Paul’s International Lutheran Church, CSI Jubilee Memorial Church, Immanuel Lutheran Church, and Bethlehem Punjabi Church. A group of nurses from Saint Mary’s Syro Malabar Church entertained with a Marggam Kali, a traditional Christian dance from Kerala.  The program was moderated by Shre John and Leno Thomas.

Indian Nurses Association Of New York Conducts Health Fair In Long Island

Indian Nurses Association of New York (INANY) is conducting a Health Fair in Kennedy Memorial Park, Long Island on April 30th from 10 am to 2 pm in collaboration with Hon. Kevin Thomas, New York State Senator.

The event is supported by Northwell Health System – Stop the Bleed program and Drug addiction prevention team, Molloy College, the non-profit organ procurement organization Live On New York, Stony Brook Mammography, and Marathon Physical Therapy Group.  The address is 335 Greenwich Street, Hempstead, NY 11550.

The goal of this event, which is open to the public “is to promote health and wellness of the society. The main focus is on the underserved and uninsured individuals and families of that area.” said Dr. Anna George, the president of INANY.

The event will facilitate health and wellness education, drug addiction prevention awareness, blood pressure monitoring, diabetes screening, mammography, and training on emergency interventions of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and how to stop bleeding. Marathon physical therapy group will teach body mechanics and simple remedies to alleviate aches and pains.

Masks, hand sanitizers, and at-home-covid test kits provided by the Senator’s office will be distributed free of charge.  There will also many giveaways and refreshments, all free of charge.

For more information:  President – Dr. Anna George (646 732 6143), Secretary – Jessy James (516 603 2024), Treasurer – Lyssy Alex (845 300 6339).

INANY Invites Essays And Scholarship Applications

Indian Nurses Association of New York (INA-NY), the voice and representative organization of professional nurses of Indian origin and heritage in New York State is inviting participation in its annual essay competition, scholarship and nursing excellence awards.

The essay contest is open for all nurses of Indian origin or heritage in New York state.  The theme for this year is “Nurses make a difference”.  Grace Alexander, the chair of the Awards and Scholarship Committee said that the essay must not be longer than two pages, must be double spaced and without any identifiable information of the author.  A separate cover page with author’s name, credentials, contact phone number(s) and email address is to be submitted with the essay.  The submission is to be sent to [email protected].  The winner will be honored at the Nurses’ Day celebration of INANY on May 7th.

The Association also invites application for Undergraduate Scholarship from student members of INANY that reside in New York state.  Students must be enrolled in a basic nursing program with at least one more semester to complete.

Nominations are invited for Annual Student Scholarship for undergraduate and Associate degree nursing students of Indian origin.  The student must be a member of INA-NY. Application form for Graduate Nursing Student Scholarship can be obtained from inany.org.

Nominations for ‘INA-NY Nurse Excellence Award 2022’ are also accepted from INANY members.  The selected candidate will exemplify the very best attributes of Nursing profession, excelled in giving high quality patient care and demonstrated a commitment to professional nursing practice.

Dr. Anna George, the president of INANY cited that the Nurses’ Day celebration provides a forum for promoting and celebrating the nursing profession, nurses, higher education, health and wellness of individuals, families and the community.  She noted that the Association’s leadership and members have been vibrant in its mission through engagement in promoting continuing education, organizing community events and community services, as well as local and international charity initiatives.

Application forms for Scholarship and Nurse Excellence Award can either be obtained from [email protected] or from its website inany.org. For details, please contact: Paul D Panakal at: 347 330 0783.

Indian Nurses Association of New York Announces Essay Contest

Indian Nurses Association of New York (INA-NY), the professional organization of nurses of Indian origin in the State of New York is inviting essays to the annual competition.  The theme of the essay is “Nurses A Voice to Lead:  A Vision for Future Healthcare”.  All nurses of Indian origin/heritage living in New York State are eligible to participate in the competition.

The two-page essay should be double spaced, without any identifiable author’s personal information.  A separate cover page with author’s name, credentials, telephone number(s) and email address is to be submitted with the essay.

The winners of 1st and 2nd place will be announced at the Nurses Day celebration of INA-NY on May 8th. Nominations are also invited for Annual Student Scholarship for undergraduate and Associate degree nursing students of Indian origin.  The student must be a member of INA-NY. Application form for Graduate Nursing Student Scholarship can be obtained from inany.org.

Nominations for ‘INA-NY Nurse Excellence Award 2021’ are also accepted from INA-NY members.  The selected candidate will exemplify the very best attributes of Nursing profession, excelled in giving high quality patient care and demonstrated a commitment to professional nursing practice.

The leadership of INA-NY intents to utilize the Nurses Day celebrations for promoting nursing, nurses, education, health and wellness. The submission is to be sent to Grace Alexander, Chair of the Awards & Scholarship committee at [email protected].

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