Vikas Kumar Vikash And Pejavar Murari Named Among The 75 Pride Of India Awardees

Chicago, IL: February 11, 2023 The Global Strategic Alliance G.S.A. India @75 Expo USA announced the Pride of India awards being presented to 75 outstanding Indians from different walks of life for their impactful work to celebrate Azadi Ka Amrit Mahotsav. An initiative of  Indian diaspora from Chicago, U.S.A.

 

Vikash Kumar Vikash, IPS, Inspector General Of Police and Managing Director of Mysore Sales International Ltd, MSIL, Bangalore was named as one of the 75 Pride of India awardees for his dynamic leadership in MSIL’s outstanding growth postcovid particularly in promoting the use of renewable energy and aggressive marketing which made MSIL successfully venture into the tourism and hospitality sector which reaped profits.

 

Pejavar Murari, IAS (Retd), Adviser to the President of Federation of Indian Chamber of Commerce & Industries, FICCI, New Delhi, India was also awarded in recognition of his distinguished career in the Indian Administrative Service including being the former Secretary to President of India, R. Venkataraman. The citation recalled Murari’s entrepreneurial leadership including being the current Chairman of ABAN Offshore Ltd, Chairman, Advisory Board Lochan & Company and Chairman, Lepra India Trust, New Delhi. Murari also serves as the Director of Bajaj Auto, Xpro India, Idea Cellular and Fortis Mallar. Murari is also on the Governing Council of Loyola Institute of Business Administration, LIBA Chennai and the Business Advisory Council of Great Lakes Institute of Management.

 

Ms. Seeta Bala, G.S.A. Awards Jury Chair announced the other Pride of India awards including 17year old Aryan Lakshmanan, Grade 11 Student, L’école Chempaka School, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, Praful Billore, CEO, MBA Chaiwala, Indore, India, Dr. Chitti R. Moorthy, Radiation Oncologist, Westchester, New York, Madhu Uppal, Community Activist, Naperville, Illinois, Dr. Paul Dhinakaran, Chancellor, Karunya University, Coimbatore, India, Cottalango Leon, 2016 Academy Award Winner, Scientific & Tech Achievement in Animation, Los Angeles, Rajkumar Rajappa, Chairman, President NHEL Small Scale Industries Association, Trichy, Tamil Nadu, Ms. Geeta Radhakrishnan, CPA, New York, Dr. Sambhu Banik, Eminent Clinical Psychologist & Former Member, Presidential Commission on Persons with Intellectual Disabilities, Washington D.C., USA, Sukhpal Singh Dhanoa, White House Correspondent & Bureau Chief PTC News, Washington, D.C., Ms. Rajeswari Rajagopal, Kids Education Counselor, Surakhsha Bhuja Foundation, Chennai, Tamil- Nadu, Ravi Karkara, Global Champion of Sustainability, New York, Tenkasi ‘s Ananthan Ayyasamy, State Vice President, Tamil Nadu BJP Party, Padmashri S.V. Rama Rao, eminent Artiste & Educationalist, Palos Hills, Illinois, Simarpreet Singh, CEO, Hartek Solar, New Delhi, Manav Subodh, Founder- Global Ambassador UC Berkeley & Founder 1M1B, New Delhi, Usha Boddapu, CEO/Founder, Esolvit, Austin, Texas, Padmanabhan Venkatesan, Treasurer, World Federation of Tamil Youth, Phoenix, Arizona, 25 year old Ulhas Satyanarayan, Member, India’s Basketball Team, New Delhi, & First Indian to play in European Professional Basketball League, Moldovia, Sushil Mitruka, Chairman and Managing Director of Kusum Udyog Ltd & Group of Industries, Siliguri, India, Shweta Baid, First Indian Alderwoman of Aurora City, IL, Thirumala Kumbum, CEO, Value Financial Services, Texas and Dr. Mohammed Jameel, Member Illinois Physician Disciplinary Board, Springfield, IL among others.

 

Dr. Vijay G Prabhakar, President, GSA India@75 Expo USA said that this epic one of kind Expo brought together ANCIENT INDIA and NEW INDIA on a single platform that included a vibrant tradeshow, meaningful daily workshops, informative plenary sessions on India’s growth, interactive sessions on Yoga, Meditation, & Ayurveda and a rich cultural extravaganza of India’s dance and music.

 

Dr. Ajit Pant, Chairman, GSA India@75 Expo USA said that the three day Expo held from December 15 to 17, 2022 at Lisle, Naperville was the most impactful event of 2022. Dr Pant added that the Expo Sequel will be held in six major cities including New York, Atlanta, Houston, Miami, San Francisco and Washington D.C. throughout 2023.

 

Shree Gurusamy, CEO GSA India@75 Expo USA that the theme is Made in India Made for the World and that the showcasing of India will continue through Amrit Kaal, the next 25 years.

 

26 year old Sailesh Singh, Founder of Youth 2047, Siliguri India declared that GSA India@100 Expo will be celebrated in 2047 in the U.S.A and India. Dr. Vasavi Chakka, Dean of the Global Eye International Institute of Leadership, New York announced that short term Leadership Training Programs to focus on U.S.A – India relationships in six sectors starting from June 2023 will be conducted to create tomorrow’s inclusive leaders today. This will be an excellent opportunity for both Indians and Indian diaspora throughout the world to interact with the U.S. Congressional leadership and network with experts in the different sectors, added Dr Chakka.

 

Seeta Bala, G.S.A. India Expo Awards Jury Chair said that the Pride of India Awardees will be given annually to outstanding Indians including the Indian diaspora under different categories in recognition of their inclusive leadership to empower our Community. Seeta Bala added that the impactful G.S.A. India @75 Expo is hosting Sequels across North America, Europe, Africa, Latin America and Australia Continents throughout Amrit Kaal.

 

Nominations for 2023 G.S.A Pride of India Awards can be emailed to [email protected] on or before April 22, 2023.

India Likely To Allow Foreign Universities

Can India create a higher education system worthy of its aspirations as a full-fledged knowledge economy? That’s still to be determined. But India is on the verge of taking a major, long-awaited first step in the right direction: With the recent release of draft rules by the country’s higher education regulator – the University Grants Commission – India is moving closer to allowing high-quality foreign universities to set up campuses to help meet the country’s growing appetite for advanced education.

Crucially, under the rules, which will have to be approved by Parliament, foreign universities would get the freedom to decide their own curriculums, fix fees and hire faculty at terms of their choosing. They would even be allowed to repatriate earnings. That all might seem underwhelming to readers accustomed to the U.S. system. But it would be a radical – and, eventually, perhaps game-changing – shift for India.

And India’s higher education system badly needs shaking up. Setting aside issues of quality (as if those can be set aside), India does not come close to providing sufficient seats to those aspiring to higher education – a glaring shortcoming as India’s burgeoning middle class strives to prepare their children for the opportunities of the future.

India’s system has its successes, of course, but they are narrow. Just nine Indian higher education institutions made the top 500 of the most recent QS World University Rankings. The top one – the Indian Institute of Science (at 155) – is a highly specialized institution focused on postgraduate studies and research in the sciences. The other eight are part of the well-known Indian Institutes of Technology, which specialize in engineering. The highest-ranked comprehensive university was the University of Delhi, falling in the 520s.

That is simply not good enough. All told, India has just over 1,000 institutions of higher learning. China, with a similar population, has three times that. The United States, with a much smaller population, has four times as many.

India’s gross enrollment ratio for higher education – the percentage of college-age adults who are enrolled – is around 27 percent, much lower than in advanced economies and even other emerging economies such as Brazil and China. Expect that figure to increase. If the supply of higher education cannot keep pace, more students will look overseas, as so many already do. Canada, the United States, Australia and Britain are primary destinations. The “import” of higher education from other English-speaking countries makes no sense for a country that prides itself on a service-based economy and its English language advantage. Education should be a sector that provides export earnings.

So, what’s the problem? Overregulation, as with so much of the Indian economy. Other parts of the economy have been liberalized over the years, but not higher ed.

More than half of Indian colleges and universities are government-run – around 200 by the federal government and 400 by state governments. Of course, it is not uncommon for countries to have large public university systems. But India grants little autonomy to such institutions, which have no freedom to set tuition and fees – kept artificially low by the pressures of populist politics.

Thus, institutions are totally dependent on the government for funding, eroding what autonomy exists on paper. The federal and state governments have serious fiscal constraints, and higher education always struggles in the competition for resources. Faculty salaries are benchmarked with civil servants, but at a somewhat lower level; tenure and promotions are based on service time, not merit. There is no way to reward stellar talent.

Private universities, too, are overly regulated and cannot operate for profit. That deters the best entrepreneurs from entering the sector.

Critics argue that allowing in foreign universities will not solve the problem, and it’s true it won’t be a cure-all. But if even a small number of acclaimed universities establish campuses, it would both improve overall quality and inject some competition into a sector that badly needs it. It should also induce more top academic talent to stay in India.

More important, it would set a precedent that Indian universities, both public and private, can and will use to argue for greater liberalization and freedom. They will push for a level playing field, which will eventually be granted. In the long run, high-quality foreign university campuses and improved Indian institutions can attract students from Africa and elsewhere in Asia, turning higher ed into the growth-and-jobs pillar that it should be in a world-leading economy.

Of course, it would be better if Indian institutions could get the benefits of change before, or at least alongside, foreign universities. But in India’s reform-resistant system, sometimes all you can do is open one window at a time.

Dhiraj Nayyar is the director for economics and policy at Vedanta Resources, whose philanthropic arm runs three not-for-profit colleges in India.

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